Volunteer Role List
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Administration

Board Member
The WTG is governed by a thirteen member board of directors who are responsible for the operation of the organization as well as the maintenance of the Burton Leavitt Theatre. Board members attend monthly meetings where they make decisions regarding programming, budgeting and other issues that affect the overall functioning of the Guild. Each board member also assumes responsibility for some aspect of the theatre. If you would like to play a bigger role in the future of the WTG as a board member, let us know.

Data Entry
If you enjoy sitting at a computer entering data, we may have a project for you. From time to time, we need help inputting information into one of our computer systems and these projects often get put off because no one has the time to enter the data. You could help us move ahead.

Database Development
Are you knowledgeable in the area of database design and maintenance? We know that we could do a lot more with some of our data but we need your expertise to help make it a reality. You could help us with marketing and management of all our human resources from audience members to actors to volunteers to sponsors.

Financial/Accounting
Like any business, there are bills to pay and reports to run to keep up with the financial reporting of the organization. If this is your area of expertise and you are computer-savy, we could use your help to lighten the load of our Treasurer.

Grant Writer
We would love to have someone devoted to seeking grant funding for the WTG. We currently receive a grant from the State of Connecticut but we know there are many other funding opportunities out there that could help us expand our program. We just need someone with the time, skills and abilities to get out there and help us find the money.

Poster Distributor
If you have seen our beautiful posters, you know that we should have them hanging in establishments all over the greater Windham area. If you frequent organizations that have other posters hanging, please consider helping us get ours out to a broader community. There are still so many people to tell about the WTG.

Committee

Fundraising Committee
If you enjoy networking with people and are not afraid to ask them to support the WTG, you may be interested in joining the Fundraising Committee. The committee produces three major events each year: the Giant Indoor Tag Sale in January, the “Year of Dining Out” Raffle in the spring and the Chocolate Festival and Auction in October. Committee members are responsible for organizing, soliciting items and selling tickets for these events as well as encouraging other forms of financial support for the WTG. Meetings are held about 8 times a year and members are expected to participate in all three events. The WTG truly could not exist without the work of this committee!

Play Reading Committee
If you love to read and have a good knowledge of the many aspects of theater, possess the ability to collaborate via email on a regular basis and are a good team player, we could use you on the Playreading Committee. Our mission is to choose a well- balanced season of shows that we feel will be financially successful. We consider cast requirements, and all aspects of the technical side of a show…scenery, costumes, lights, sound and props. By January we put a season proposal together and present it to the Board of Directors who has the final say. We meet roughly every two months to share scripts and report in. Hard work but lots of fun.

Volunteer Committee
If you are a people person the volunteer committee might be for you! The charge of the Volunteer Committee is to get volunteers involved in WTG activities through Recruitment, Education and Communication. This committee meets monthly and hosts Open House Events and Training Sessions.

Costumes

Costume Designer
Costume designers create the look of each character by designing clothes and accessories the actors will wear in performance. Depending on their style and complexity, costumes may be made, bought, revamped out of existing stock or rented. Their designs need to faithfully reflect the personalities of the characters in the script and the time period of the play.

Sewing/Fitting

Lighting & Sound

Lighting Assistant
The lighting assistant is responsible for assisting the lighting designer, as needed, to hang, focus, and program lights. During the show, the assistant will run the light board and/or spotlights. This person reports to the stage manager, and will be expected to attend all technical rehearsals for 1-2 weeks prior to the show opening, as well as all shows. No experience is necessary; we will provide the necessary training.

Lighting Designer
Lighting designers know how to make the best use of the subtle and powerful medium of light, creating effects that can be changed at will to match the mood of the action. Light Designers and directors will coordinate together to share ideas about how light could be used to enhance the production concept. Lighting designers attend rehearsals to get a feel for the lighting cues and to plan how to light the actors as they move from place to place on stage. When the blocking is set, the lighting designer can start to work out which lighting instruments will be used and where each one will be located.

Sound Assistant
The sound assistant will set all microphones and run sound checks prior to each show, and run sound in the tech booth during shows. This person will report to the stage manager and is expected to attend all technical rehearsals for 1-2 weeks prior to the show opening, as well as all shows. No experience is necessary; we will provide the necessary training.

Sound Effects Designer
The sound designer plans and provides the sound effects in the play. In addition to the sounds of the words spoken by the actors, a play may also call for sound effects to recreate lifelike noises or use music or abstract and unidentifiable sounds to support the drama. The sound designer will work in collaboration with the director to ensure sound effects match the period and needs of a production.

Other

Building Maintenance
The Burton Leavitt Theatre requires constant maintenance and we need more people to help us keep it looking and working well. We need painters, cleaners and all around handy-people to come in and take on a project or two. Many hands could make this overwhelming task seem easy. If you can give us just a few hours of your time, it could make a huge difference.

Janitor
If you enjoy vacuuming, mopping the floor or cleaning your kitchen or bathroom we need you. We depend on volunteers to keep the theatre clean and we would love to have a regular cleaning crew that could share the work. A large crew with a rotating schedule would keep the work from falling on just a few people. Grab your mop and come on down!

Photographer
Do you take great action shots with your camera? We need a photographer to take pictures of all WTG productions for use in publicizing our events. Come check out the show for free and take some great pictures that can be used to document and showcase the magic that happens on the WTG stage.

Playbill Ads
If you can sell a good idea, you may be interested in soliciting advertisers for the playbill. The organization depends heavily on the support of local businesses who advertise in the playbill to provide funding for its programming. Ads are actively solicited once a year in May and June for the beginning of the new season in July. Many businesses are repeat customers but we are always looking for new supporters. This one is a win-win for the Guild and local business!

Web/Social Media
Are you a tech savvy person with a love of theater? Help us spread the word about the Windham Theatre Guild using the web and social media resources such as Facebook, YouTube and Twitter. We are looking for people who would be interested in maintaining the website and/or taking ownership of a social media campaign for our group.

Performance

Assistant Stage Manager
Often needed in larger productions, the ASM is usually stationed just offstage to facilitate communication between the stage manager (who is out in the house) and actors. The ASM often helps with complex set changes, quick changes offstage, preparing the stage for performance and ensuring the safety of the cast and crew. Attendance is required at numerous rehearsals throughout the process and for all performances.

Backstage Assistant
The backstage assistant is responsible for organizing props, setting the stage prior to shows, executing scene changes, and cuing actors during the shows. The backstage assistant reports to the stage manager, and must attend all rehearsals for 2-3 weeks prior to the show opening, as well as all shows. No experience is necessary; we will provide the necessary training.

Choreographer
Choreographers design and direct the dance or stylized movement in musical productions, working closely with the director and musical director. A choreographer works with dancers to interpret and develop ideas and transform them into the finished performance. Stipend available.

Concession
Everybody likes something to munch on when they’re watching a show! Use your people and money skills to sell beverages and snacks before the show and during intermission. Wear white and black, arrive a half hour before doors open, and prepare and clean up the concession according to theatre procedures. The audience members will thank you again and again!

Director
The role of the director is to bring the many pieces of a production together into a unified vision. Directors’ responsibilities are to interpret a script, cast a show, collaborate with designers and develop a rehearsal plan. Interested directors are encouraged to participate in one of our productions in another capacity before directing solo with the WTG.

House Manager
If you have leadership skills, then maybe being a house manager is for you. Oversee the ushers, concession workers, and the audience and keep things in order. Answer questions and solve problems concerning the house that may arise before, during, and after the show. When things run smoothly, everyone is happy!

Make-up/Hair
Want to help out backstage and make the actors look their part? Help them with make-up and hair. Find make-up and apply it to the actors so that it will enhance their features or give them a certain look for their character. Give them hairstyles to suit a time period or find wigs that could do the trick. It’s all in the imagination as well as in the look. So, whether you have the expertise or you’re just a beginner, give it a try.

Music Director
The Music Director is responsible for providing musical input into the audition process, teaching vocal parts, (if need be, arranging vocal parts), recruiting and rehearsing pit musicians and performing the show. Stipend available.

Orchestra Member
If you play an instrument, you may be interested in being in the pit orchestra during a performance. These gigs frequently pay but we love volunteers. Commitment of at least two to three rehearsals and all performances is required.

Performer
Performers work with the director to interpret and perform a playwright’s script and/or a composer’s music. Actors must attend one night of scheduled auditions, which will include cold readings from the script. If auditioning for a musical, individuals must prepare a choral piece, and provide music for the accompanist. Performers report to the director and are responsible for attending all rehearsals, learning lines, blocking, cues, and musical selections, and caring for all assigned props and costumes. Actors are also expected to assist with set preparation and strike, as requested by the director. No prior experience is necessary to audition for shows or to be in the Adult or Youth Chorus.

Producer
If you want to learn the nuts and bolts of how a show becomes a reality on stage, you may want to train to become a producer. Producers are like project managers, overseeing all aspects of a show from planning the auditions to striking the set after the show is over. Producers are organizers, coordinators and communicators who like to work with people. The end result is a successful show that gives you a sense of pride and accomplishment.

Props Manager
Properties (or props) include those items that dress the set and all objects handled by the performers. Some research may be necessary to identify appropriate period-specific items. The props manager reports to the stage manager, and may need to attend some rehearsals. Some props may be available at the theatre. Others will need to be borrowed, made, or purchased. In the end, props have been done well if they blend with the set and no one really notices them!

Rehearsal Pianist
Often we need someone to accompany rehearsals and/or auditions. That person may also play for the performances of the show. The ability to site read, play choral parts and play the full accompaniment for the show are required. Stipend available.

Stage Manager
The stage manager is at the center of the production. He or she is the right hand of the director and provides practical and organizational support to the director, actors, designers, stage crew and technicians throughout the production process. The stage manager organizes and attends rehearsals to record all pertinent information. He or she understands and communicates all of the details of the production to the appropriate people. During the run of the show, the stage manager is in charge and runs the show from the tech booth. Stage managing is an excellent way to train to become a director or a producer.

Usher
Want to get involved in theatre, but don’t know where to start? Be an usher and see a free show! Wear white top and black bottoms and arrive a half hour before the doors open to stuff programs and to learn the layout of the seats. Use your friendly personality to greet and to seat audience members according to seat number and hand out programs. Tidy the house afterwards. You’ll want to come back again!

Set Design/Construction

Carpenter
The Burton Leavitt Theatre requires constant maintenance and we need more people to help us keep it looking and working well. We need painters, cleaners and all around handy-people to come in and take on a project or two. Many hands could make this overwhelming task seem easy. If you can give us just a few hours of your time, it could make a huge difference.

Electrician
The Burton Leavitt Theatre requires constant maintenance and we need more people to help us keep it looking and working well. We need painters, cleaners and all around handy-people to come in and take on a project or two. Many hands could make this overwhelming task seem easy. If you can give us just a few hours of your time, it could make a huge difference.

Painting
Once the sets are built, they need to be painted. If you have any artistic talent or just an interest in painting, this is the crew for you; no experience necessary! There are things to paint and create for every skill level.

Scenic Artist
A scenic artist is responsible for developing a plan and overseeing the painting of the set. For example, if a show is set in a Victorian Hotel, a scenic artist may opt to paint wallpaper onto a set wall instead of applying wall paper. The scenic artist works in collaboration with the director.

Set Construction
The set construction crew takes the visions of the set designer, and using 2x4s, 1x3s, plywood and thousands of screws, builds fabulous sets. Volunteers with some construction background are appreciated, but anyone with an interest in learning is welcome. Set construction usually happens during the days of both weekdays and weekends. Come for a day...or for an hour. No amount of time is too little!

Set Decorator
This person is responsible for securing all items needed to decorate the set that are not considered to be stage properties (props). Some research may be necessary to identify appropriate period-specific items. Some set decorations may be available at the theatre. Others will need to be borrowed, made, or purchased. In the end, decorations have been done well if they blend with the set and no one really notices them!

Set Designer
All the scenery, furniture and props the audience sees at a production of a play make up the set design. The set designer's job is to design these physical surroundings in which the action will take place. The overall look of the set also gives the audience information about the director's concept of the production.
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